My Blog

Posts for: December, 2018

December 25, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: cosmetic dentistry  
NewYearNewSmile

As December brings the old year to a close, it’s a great time to set goals for the year to come. This might include a major life change, such as a new job—or even a new romance! If one of these items is on your list for 2019, a smile makeover may be just the thing to help you get there.

Having a great smile can give your self-confidence a real boost. It can also affect how you are perceived by others. According to a survey by the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, 99.7% of adults believe a smile is an important social asset and 96% believe an attractive smile makes a person more appealing to members of the opposite sex. At the same time, three quarters of adults feel that an unattractive smile can hurt a person’s chances for career success.

If you aren’t pleased with your smile and want a new look, we can help you figure out which cosmetic dental treatments could be right for you. The answer might be something simple—like an overall brightening of the smile with professional teeth whitening, or fixing a small crack or chip in a single tooth with cosmetic tooth bonding. If you’re unhappy with worn-down or crooked teeth, dental veneers or orthodontic treatment might be the way to go. In fact, many adults find that orthodontic treatment with clear aligners is a great way to get a beautiful, straight smile without drawing attention to the fact that a makeover is in progress.

Of course, it’s not only important for your smile to look good but also for your whole mouth to stay healthy. So if you are experiencing any tooth pain, unusual mouth sores or gum problems, it’s time for you to come in for an exam. And if it’s been a while since you’ve had a dental checkup and professional teeth cleaning, why not make an appointment for early in the year? Don’t start the new year with last year’s dental problems!

If you would like more information about cosmetic dental treatments or preventive dentistry, please contact us or schedule a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “How Your Dentist Can Help You Look Younger” and “Dental Hygiene Visit.”


December 15, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: celebrity smiles   bonding  
ARoyalFix

So you’re tearing up the dance floor at a friend’s wedding, when all of a sudden one of your pals lands an accidental blow to your face — chipping out part of your front tooth, which lands right on the floorboards! Meanwhile, your wife (who is nine months pregnant) is expecting you home in one piece, and you may have to pose for a picture with the baby at any moment. What will you do now?

Take a tip from Prince William of England. According to the British tabloid The Daily Mail, the future king found himself in just this situation in 2013. His solution: Pay a late-night visit to a discreet dentist and get it fixed up — then stay calm and carry on!

Actually, dental emergencies of this type are fairly common. While nobody at the palace is saying exactly what was done for the damaged tooth, there are several ways to remedy this dental dilemma.

If the broken part is relatively small, chances are the tooth can be repaired by bonding with composite resin. In this process, tooth-colored material is used to replace the damaged, chipped or discolored region. Composite resin is a super-strong mixture of plastic and glass components that not only looks quite natural, but bonds tightly to the natural tooth structure. Best of all, the bonding procedure can usually be accomplished in just one visit to the dental office — there’s no lab work involved. And while it won’t last forever, a bonded tooth should hold up well for at least several years with only routine dental care.

If a larger piece of the tooth is broken off and recovered, it is sometimes possible to reattach it via bonding. However, for more serious damage — like a severely fractured or broken tooth — a crown (cap) may be required. In this restoration process, the entire visible portion of the tooth may be capped with a sturdy covering made of porcelain, gold, or porcelain fused to a gold metal alloy.

A crown restoration is more involved than bonding. It begins with making a 3-D model of the damaged tooth and its neighbors. From this model, a tooth replica will be fabricated by a skilled technician; it will match the existing teeth closely and fit into the bite perfectly. Next, the damaged tooth will be prepared, and the crown will be securely attached to it. Crown restorations are strong, lifelike and permanent.

Was the future king “crowned” — or was his tooth bonded? We may never know for sure. But it’s good to know that even if we’ll never be royals, we still have several options for fixing a damaged tooth. If you would like more information, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Repairing Chipped Teeth” and “Crowns and Bridgework.”


December 05, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   flossing  
DontgiveuponFlossing

A couple of years ago the Associated Press published an article claiming the health benefits of flossing remained unproven. The article cited a number of studies that seemed to conclude the evidence for the effectiveness of flossing in helping to prevent dental disease as “weak.”

As you can imagine, dental providers were a bit chagrined while flossers everywhere threw away their dental floss and happily declared their independence from their least favorite hygiene task. It would have seemed the Age of Flossing had gone the way of the dinosaurs.

But, the demise of flossing may have been greatly exaggerated. A new study from the University of North Carolina seems to contradict the findings cited in the AP article. This more recent study looked at dental patients in two groups—those who flossed and those who didn’t—during two periods of five and ten years respectively. The new study found conclusively that the flosser group on average had a lower risk of tooth loss than the non-flossers.

While this is an important finding, it may not completely put the issue to rest. But assuming it does, let’s get to the real issue with flossing: a lot of people don’t like it, for various reasons. It can be time-consuming; it can be messy; and, depending on a person’s physical dexterity, difficult to perform.

On the latter, there are some things you can do to make it a less difficult task. You can use a floss threader, a device that makes it easier to thread the floss through the teeth. You can also switch to an oral irrigator or “water flosser,” a pump device that sprays a fine, pressurized stream of water to break up plaque between teeth and flush most of it away. We can also give you tips and training for flossing with just your fingers and thread.

But whatever you do, don’t give up the habit. It may not be your most favorite hygiene task but most dentists agree it can help keep your teeth healthy for the long-term.

If you would like more information on the benefits of flossing, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.